• Here’s an interesting 1990s (1996?) moment for you. This was that time that I painted my face like Gene Simmons of KISS to shoot a video for a HS class (Poetry of Song) assignment—I introduced video clips with this look. I’m also wearing the Pulp Fiction T-Shirt a friend had silkscreened, thinking that was a good idea for a silkscreen. I turned the shirt inside-out to hide the lettering, but that didn’t work. I’m kinda glad it didn’t because it’s now a testament to place and time.

    Here’s an interesting 1990s (1996?) moment for you. This was that time that I painted my face like Gene Simmons of KISS to shoot a video for a HS class (Poetry of Song) assignment—I introduced video clips with this look. I’m also wearing the Pulp Fiction T-Shirt a friend had silkscreened, thinking that was a good idea for a silkscreen. I turned the shirt inside-out to hide the lettering, but that didn’t work. I’m kinda glad it didn’t because it’s now a testament to place and time.


  • 2 days ago
  • I was recently moved by the sight of Jim Hodges’ glass sculpture, ghost (2008), currently on view at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston in the exhibition, Give More Than You Take. The wall text explains that the sculpture had been inspired by an early 16th century Albrecht Dürer watercolor and the work certainly projects, from within its vitrine, ethereal concepts of the natural world.
ghost also reminded me of this “miscellaneous” 19th century stereo view by an anonymous maker. It reflects a Victorian tradition of preserving flowers and arraigning them in ways that would communicate sentiments about loved ones, as well as religious beliefs. This image is brought closer when viewed in 3D.
Like Hodges’ work it is a poignant expression of the material desire to capture fleeting emotions.
 

    I was recently moved by the sight of Jim Hodges’ glass sculpture, ghost (2008), currently on view at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston in the exhibition, Give More Than You Take. The wall text explains that the sculpture had been inspired by an early 16th century Albrecht Dürer watercolor and the work certainly projects, from within its vitrine, ethereal concepts of the natural world.

    ghost also reminded me of this “miscellaneous” 19th century stereo view by an anonymous maker. It reflects a Victorian tradition of preserving flowers and arraigning them in ways that would communicate sentiments about loved ones, as well as religious beliefs. This image is brought closer when viewed in 3D.

    Like Hodges’ work it is a poignant expression of the material desire to capture fleeting emotions.

     


  • 1 week ago
  • John Walker, “Diagonal Hollyhocks,” A/P, 2003. #johnwalkerartist

    John Walker, “Diagonal Hollyhocks,” A/P, 2003. #johnwalkerartist


  • 2 weeks ago
  • Beastie Boys, Licensed to Ill; Def Jam recordings, 1986. At one point during my childhood, Brass Monkey was my favorite song. I didn’t know what it was about, but I knew I liked it. #Beastieboys

    Beastie Boys, Licensed to Ill; Def Jam recordings, 1986. At one point during my childhood, Brass Monkey was my favorite song. I didn’t know what it was about, but I knew I liked it. #Beastieboys


  • 2 weeks ago
  • Brewster McCloud lobby card, 1971.

    Brewster McCloud lobby card, 1971.


  • 3 weeks ago
  • hyperallergic:

Anna Valdez, “Picnic” (2014), oil on canvas. 42 x 42 inches. 

    hyperallergic:

    Anna Valdez, “Picnic” (2014), oil on canvas. 42 x 42 inches. 

    (via buvisualarts)

  • 4 weeks ago
  • buvisualarts:

I do not see why the loss of faith in the known image and symbol in our time should be celebrated as a freedom. It is a loss from which we suffer, and this pathos motivates modern painting and poetry at its heart.
I think the only pressing question in painting is: When are you through? For my own part it is when I know I’ve “come out the other side.” This occasional and sudden awareness is the truest image for me. The clocklike path of this recognition suppresses a sense of victory: it is an ironic encounter and more of a mirror than a picture.
-Philip Guston, from the catalogue for 1958 Whitney Museum of American Art exhibition, Nature in Abstraction.

    buvisualarts:

    I do not see why the loss of faith in the known image and symbol in our time should be celebrated as a freedom. It is a loss from which we suffer, and this pathos motivates modern painting and poetry at its heart.

    I think the only pressing question in painting is: When are you through? For my own part it is when I know I’ve “come out the other side.” This occasional and sudden awareness is the truest image for me. The clocklike path of this recognition suppresses a sense of victory: it is an ironic encounter and more of a mirror than a picture.

    -Philip Guston, from the catalogue for 1958 Whitney Museum of American Art exhibition, Nature in Abstraction.

  • 4 weeks ago
  • The Somerville Theatre…rockin’ in 1914 same as 2014.

    The Somerville Theatre…rockin’ in 1914 same as 2014.


  • 4 weeks ago
  • Diagram of the Lost City of Gold

    Diagram of the Lost City of Gold

  • 1 month ago
  • "Barnie Adventurous and the Lost City of Gold: Something Neither Cortes or Coronado Could Find," which I authored and illustrated at age 11. From the back cover: "When Barnie finds a map in a gold casket on an expedition that almost kills him he sets out for an adventure of his life. Out of 6 men including Barnie only 2 will make it. Where is the knight that holds a magic sword and shield and where is the lost city of gold are just two of the questions Barnie asks. But will Barnie be able to find something neither Cortes or Coronado could find? Will he be burried [sic] alive in the room before the magical city? Find out in this exciting adventure written and illustrated by [#logenscoolstuff] author of 5 books, but none as wonderful as this.

    "Barnie Adventurous and the Lost City of Gold: Something Neither Cortes or Coronado Could Find," which I authored and illustrated at age 11. From the back cover: "When Barnie finds a map in a gold casket on an expedition that almost kills him he sets out for an adventure of his life. Out of 6 men including Barnie only 2 will make it. Where is the knight that holds a magic sword and shield and where is the lost city of gold are just two of the questions Barnie asks. But will Barnie be able to find something neither Cortes or Coronado could find? Will he be burried [sic] alive in the room before the magical city? Find out in this exciting adventure written and illustrated by [#logenscoolstuff] author of 5 books, but none as wonderful as this.


  • 1 month ago